Famous Ancestors

My family is directly descended from many famous rulers from throughout the history of the world, mostly through the Hail side. Yet, these ancestors are so far back, many many generations ago, there are hundreds of thousands of people directly connected to them today. So, it’s really just fun trivia at this point! Here’s a sampling of who we have descended from:

Charlemagne

Charlemagne (2 April 742 – 28 January 814) was King of the Franks from 768 and Emperor of the Romans from 800 to his death. He expanded the Frankish kingdom into a Frankish Empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe. During his reign, he conquered Italy and was crowned Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III on 25 December 800 which temporarily made him a rival of the Byzantine Emperor in Constantinople. His rule is also associated with the Carolingian Renaissance, a revival of art, religion, and culture through the medium of the Catholic Church. Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne helped define both Western Europe and the Middle Ages.

Today he is regarded not only as the founding father of both French and German monarchies, but also as the father of Europe: his empire united most of Western Europe for the first time since the Romans, and the Carolingian renaissance encouraged the formation of a common European identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots, was King of England from 1272 to 1307. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father’s reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English Barons. Physically, Edward was an imposing man; at 6 foot 2 inches he towered over most of his contemporaries,and hence perhaps his epithet “longshanks”. He also had a reputation for a fierce temper, and he could be intimidating; one story tells of how the Dean of St Paul’s, wishing to confront Edward over the high level of taxation in 1295, fell down and died once he was in the king’s presence. Physically, Edward was an imposing man; at 6 foot 2 inches he towered over most of his contemporaries,and hence perhaps his epithet “longshanks”. He also had a reputation for a fierce temper, and he could be intimidating; one story tells of how the Dean of St Paul’s, wishing to confront Edward over the high level of taxation in 1295, fell down and died once he was in the king’s presence. Edward is unflatteringly depicted in several novels and films as a cruel, hard-hearted tyrant.

 

 

 

 

John (24 December 1167 – 19 October 1216) was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death. He acceded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I, who died without issue. John was the youngest of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, and was their second surviving son to ascend the throne; thus, he continued the line of Plantagenet or Angevin kings of England.

Apart from entering popular legend as the enemy of Robin Hood, he is perhaps best-known for having acquiesced – to the barons of English nobility – to seal Magna Carta, a document which limited kingly power in England and which is popularly thought as an early step in the evolution of limited government.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France 1137-1152 and queen consort of England 1154-1189. Eleanor was very beautiful: all contemporary sources agree on this point.Even in an era when ladies of the nobility were excessively praised, their praise of her was undoubtedly sincere. When she was young, she was described as perpulchra – more than beautiful.

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Maud Le-Vieux crowned Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031 – 2 November 1083) was the wife of William the Conqueror and, as such, Queen consort of the Kingdom of England. She bore William eleven children, including two kings, William II and Henry I.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duncan I, or Donnchad mac Crínáin (died 14 August 1040) was king of Scotland. Duncan is depicted as an elderly King in Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Unlike the “King Duncan” of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the historical Duncan appears to have been a young man. He followed his grandfather Malcolm as king after the latter’s death on 25 November 1034.

John (24 December 1167 – 19 October 1216[1]) was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death. He acceded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I, who died without issue. John was the youngest of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, and was their second surviving son to ascend the throne; thus, he continued the line of Plantagenet or Angevin kings of England.
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8 Comments to “Famous Ancestors”

  1. Looking good, Jordan! Don’t forget to add the Kings Henrys I, II, and III! It would also be interesting to learn more about the King Philips and Louis of France we’re related to, as well as the other kings of Scotland and the kings of Ireland.

    • Thanks…. who wrote this… Mom? Why did you write my name and email in the info fields? You’re supposed to write your own info so I know! I will update this page when I have more time though, I’m not done yet!

  2. Yup, it’s me. Loved the new addition about King John to your home page. You have a great writing style! Love it! The multimedia aspect makes it more interesting, too.

  3. You also might be interested in this line:

    Jordan Catherine Pagan
    Karen Lee Hail and Eduardo Obregon Pagan
    Joy Evelyn Knight and William Douglas Hail
    Douglas Ewart Knight and Elinor Winsome Leitch
    Chester Claude Knight and Nettie Greenleaf Crawford
    John Knight and Martha Caroline Bryer
    Timothy Knight and Elizabeth Heal
    Sarah Dunton and John Knight
    Timothy Dunton and Elizabeth Smith
    John Dunton Jr. and Sarah Jeffords
    John Dunton and Ruth Frost
    Samuel Dunton and Hannah Felch
    Elizabeth Baynton and John Dutton
    Lucy Danvers and Sir Henry Baynton
    Elizabeth Nevill and John Danvers
    John Nevill Baron Latimer and Lucy Somerset Baroness Latimer
    John Nevill Baron Latimer and Dorothy De Vere
    Ann Stafford and Richard Neville
    Catherine Fray and Humphrey Stafford
    Countess Beaufort and Ralph De Neville, Earl of Westmoreland
    Edward and Catherine de Roet
    King Edward III Plantagenet and Eleanor of Provence
    King Edward II and Isabella, Princess of France
    King Edward I and Eleanor de Castile

    This connects to the rest of King Edward I’s line from my father. And, if you go through Princess Isabella’s line – this is what you find:

    Isabella, Princess of France and King Edward II
    Phillippe IV, King of France, and Jeanne I of Navarre
    Philip “The Bold” III, King of France, and Isabelle of Aragon, Queen of France
    Louis IX, King of France, and Marguerite De Provence
    Louis VIII, King of France, and Berengaria Alfonsez
    Phillippe II, King of France, and Isabella de Hainault
    Louis VII, King of France, and Eleanore, Princess of Aquitaine
    Phillippe I, King of France, and Bertha de Holland
    Henri I, King of France, and Anna Agnesa, Grand Duchess of Kiev (this leads to a Swedish line of royals)
    Robert I, King of France, and Rosala or Susanna, Queen of France

    • I’m not really interested in ancestors with royal lineage. It adds an interesting component to our family tree, but nothing more. “Royals” were just people, in the end, though with nicer clothes and bigger houses. They aren’t any more interesting than the serfs that worked their land, who had their own equally interesting stories, which were never heard.

      These royals are so far back, many many generations ago, that there are hundreds of thousands of people directly connected to them today. So, it’s really just trivia at this point. That’s all this page is.

  4. I think your “hundreds of thousands” figure is just a tad exaggerated, to put it mildly. Tell you what, Jordan, we’ll both go back in time and you be a serf and I’ll be a royal and we’ll see who has a better time! 🙂

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